Planned Parenthood says experts find misleading edits in videos

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Planned Parenthood has paid forensic experts to comb through undercover videos released by anti-abortion activists, and their report finds significant distortions and misleading edits. The report has been handed over to Congress, which is investigating allegations that Planned Parenthood illegally profits from fetal tissue donation.

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States pressed to increase efforts to reduce drownings

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life-jacket-float By Michael Ollove
Stateline

Accidental drowning is the second leading cause of death for U.S. children under age 5, after birth defects. For youngsters under 15, only traffic accidents are responsible for more deaths by injury. And while drowning rates have declined slightly since the turn of the century, African Americans continue to die from drowning at considerably higher rates than whites.

Faced with such stubborn figures, public health advocates and researchers complain that state and local governments aren’t doing enough to prevent drowning deaths. Critics say most states don’t have sufficient laws or don’t enforce laws that could lessen the chances of drowning, such as requirements for fencing around private pools and the presence of trained lifeguards. And, they say, too little is being done to make sure that children have swim lessons and water safety skills.

“There is so much that can and should be done,” said Andrea Gielen, director of the Johns Hopkins University Center for Injury Research and Policy. Continue reading

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Private money saves successful Colorado IUD program

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By Katie Kerwin McCrimmon, Health News Colorado

A Colorado birth control program that has cut unintended pregnancies and abortions by nearly half since 2009 will stay alive for at least one more year thanks to $2 million in donations from private foundations.

Women and health advocates held a rally at the Capitol to urge approval of a program that provides IUDs and long-acting birth control devices to young women (Photo by Katie Kerwin McCrimmon/Health News Colorado).

Women and health advocates held a rally at the Capitol to urge approval of a program that provides IUDs and long-acting birth control devices to young women (Photo by Katie Kerwin McCrimmon/Health News Colorado).

The rescue of the highly-touted program comes after Republican lawmakers earlier this year killed a bill that would have provided $5 million in public funding for IUDs and other long-acting reversible contraceptives for low-income teens and young women.

Colorado health officials estimate that the IUDs and other devices have saved at least $79 million in Medicaid costs for unintended births, but some opponents claimed that IUDs are abortifacients and refused to approve funding in the Republican-controlled Senate.

From mid-2009 to mid-2015, the Susan Thompson Buffett Foundation funded a pilot effort in Colorado with a $25 million grant. The Colorado Family Planning Initiative provided teens and young women with more than 36,000 free or low-cost IUDs or other long-acting birth control devices.

The newest data from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment show a 48 percent drop statewide in unintended pregnancies and abortions. Births among teens ages 15 to 19 fell from 6,201 in 2009 to 3,361 in 2014, while abortions declined from 1,711 to 939 in the same period.

The 48 percent reduction is up from a 40 percent drop through 2013. Continue reading

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Few health savings accounts owners invest, study

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HSA piggy bank 300By Michelle Andrews
KHN

Only a tiny fraction of the growing number of people with health savings accounts invests the money in their accounts in the financial markets, according to a recent study.

The vast majority leave their contributions in savings accounts instead where the money may earn lower returns.

People who have had their health savings accounts for a longer period of time are more likely to invest their contributions, suggesting that there’s a learning curve in grasping how the accounts work and how to use them, says Paul Fronstin, director of the Health Research and Education Program at the Employee Benefit Research Institute and the study’s author.

Forty-seven percent of HSAs with investments were opened between 2005 and 2008; in 2014, just 5 percent of HSAs that were opened had investments. Continue reading

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State health exchange will offer more plans for 2016

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From the Washington Healthplanfinder

Washington Healthplanfinder to Offer Residents More Health Plan Options This Fall

Coverage is hereThe Washington Health Benefit Exchange Board today provided final certification of Qualified Health Plans to be offered through Washington Healthplanfinder during the third open enrollment period.

The open enrollment period, which runs from Nov. 1, 2015, to Jan. 31, 2016, provides coverage starting Jan. 1, 2016.

Exchange Board Certifies More than 180 Health Plans to be offered Starting Nov. 1

Following approval by the Office of the Insurance Commissioner yesterday, the Board certified 12 health insurance carriers at the monthly Board meeting to offer 136 Qualified Health Plans for individuals and families.

Additionally, six insurance carriers will offer eight pediatric Qualified Dental Plans. Last year, 10 health insurers were approved to sell 82 plans for individuals and families.

Every county in Washington State will again see an increased number of health plan options this fall. In the first open enrollment period, only two counties had more than six carriers offering coverage. This year, 14 counties will have more than six carriers offering coverage.

Approved insurance companies that are new to the market include Dentegra, Health Alliance Northwest, Regence BlueShield and UnitedHealthcare of Washington. Health plans still under review by the Office of the Insurance Commissioner include Coordinated Care. If Coordinated Care is approved, the Board may provide final certification at a later date.

Approval from the Office of the Insurance Commissioner and Board certification for these plans is required under the Affordable Care Act to ensure that each plan meets the requirements for Qualified Health Plans and the 10 essential health benefits, including regular doctor’s visits, maternity care and hospital stays.

 

The following insurance carriers were approved to sell health and pediatric dental plans through Washington Healthplanfinder:

  • BridgeSpan Health Company
  • Columbia United Providers
  • Community Health Plan of Washington
  • Delta Dental of Washington – pediatric dental only
  • Dental Health Services – pediatric dental only
  • Dentegra – pediatric dental only
  • Group Health Cooperative
  • Health Alliance Northwest
  • Kaiser Permanente – health and pediatric dental plans
  • LifeWise – health and pediatric dental plans
  • Moda Health
  • Molina Healthcare of Washington
  • Premera Blue Cross – health and pediatric dental plans
  • Regence BlueShield
  • UnitedHealthcare of Washington

Washington Healthplanfinder Business, the state’s business marketplace, will expand its statewide coverage this year with two insurance carriers, Moda Health and UnitedHealthCare, and 47 plans available. Kaiser Permanente will continue to offer health plans to small businesses in Clark and Cowlitz counties.

Starting this November under the Affordable Care Act, Washington Healthplanfinder Business will expand its coverage from businesses of up to 50 employees to larger businesses of up to 100 employees. Washington Healthplanfinder Business allows businesses to compare plans, decide their contribution level and manage payment in one place. Eligible small business owners may also access tax credits when they enroll through Washington Healthplanfinder Business.

Five additional multi-state plans must be certified by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) before they can be offered through Washington Healthplanfinder. Multi-state plans are provided by OPM and private insurance carriers to drive additional competition in health insurance marketplaces across the country.

More information about the health plans that will be offered on Washington Healthplanfinder is available by clicking here.

For more information about Washington Healthplanfinder, please visit www.wahealthplanfinder.org.

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Vaccine rates leave many Washington toddlers at risk

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Alert IconFrom Washington State Department of Health

New immunization rates show many toddlers across the state aren’t getting vaccinated for certain diseases on time, if at all, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Immunization Survey.

The trend means more children are at risk of getting measles, whooping cough, or other preventable diseases.

The trend means more children are at risk of getting measles, whooping cough, or other preventable diseases.

The annual survey reports that children between 19 and 35 months of age weren’t any more protected against serious and potentially fatal diseases than the year before. About 67 percent of toddlers in 2014 were fully vaccinated by 3 years of age.

This overall rate is about 3 percent lower than 2013, but statistically the two rates are not significantly different.Washington’s immunization rates for 2014 did not improve for most recommended vaccines for young children.

The lone exception was the dose of hepatitis B vaccine given at birth. Coverage rates for the hepatitis B birth dose vaccine exceeded national coverage rates, increasing to almost 80 percent.

“The data show that we’re not protecting all of our kids as well as we should,” said State Health Officer Dr. Kathy Lofy. “We’re disappointed that our rates aren’t higher. When kids aren’t fully protected, it puts those kids and the wider community at risk of disease. The recent spike in measles cases and the ongoing whooping cough outbreak highlights the need for high vaccination rates.” Continue reading

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Rest assured: Surgeons’ late-night work doesn’t cause patients harm – study

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surgeons performing surgery in operating roomBy Lisa Gillespie
KHN

Patients receiving common operations in the daytime fared no worse in the short-term if their attending physician worked a hospital graveyard shift the night before than patients whose doctor did not, according to a new study examining the effects of sleep deprivation on surgeons. Continue reading

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Seattle Children’s discovers lapse in sterilization at Bellevue clinic | Patients may need to be tested for Hep. B, C, HIV – Bellevue Reporter

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Seattle Children's Whale LogoSeattle Children’s Hospital is working with the state health department and the Centers for Disease Control after it was revealed that the required procedures for cleaning and sterilizing surgical instruments at the hospital’s Bellevue Clinic and Surgery Center were not always followed.

“I understand that families will be concerned, and rightly so, but from a scientific perspective, the risk is low, which I hope that families find reassuring,’ Seattle and King County Public Health official Justin Duchin, M.D. said at a press conference on August 26.

As a result of the problems with sterilization, patients who had a surgical procedure at the Bellevue Clinic may need to be tested for hepatitis B and C, as well as HIV, the hospital said in a statement.

Source: Seattle Children’s discovers lapse in sterilization at Bellevue clinic | Patients may need to be tested for Hep. B, C, HIV – Bellevue Reporter

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Activists sought private abortion details using Washington state public records laws

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ProPublica LogoBy Charles Ornstein ProPublica
This story was co-published with the Washington Post.

A few years back, Jonathan Bloedow filed a series of requests under Washington state’s Public Records Act asking for details on pregnancies terminated at abortion clinics around the state.

For every abortion, he wanted information on the woman’s age and race, where she lived, how long she had been pregnant and how past pregnancies had ended. He also wanted to know about any complications, but he didn’t ask for names.

This is all information that Washington’s health department, as those in other states, collects to track vital statistics.

What has been your experience with patient privacy? Do you think your medical information was shared by your doctor or health-care provider? Do you think it was involved in a breach? Tell us your story.

Bloedow, 43, isn’t a public health researcher, a traditional journalist or a clinic owner. He’s an anti-abortion activist who had previously sued Planned Parenthood, accusing the group of overcharging the government for contraception. Continue reading

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Racial gap in attitudes toward hospice care

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By Sarah Varney

BUFFALO — Twice already Narseary and Vernal Harris have watched a son die. The first time — Paul, at age 26 — was agonizing and frenzied, his body tethered to a machine meant to keep him alive as his incurable sickle cell disease progressed.

When the same illness ravaged Solomon, at age 33, the Harrises reluctantly turned to hospice in the hope that his last days might somehow be less harrowing than his brother’s.

Their expectations were low. “They take your money,” Mrs. Harris said, describing what she had heard of hospice. “Your loved ones don’t see you anymore. You just go there and die.” Continue reading

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States look for more effective ways to encourage vaccinations

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Boy gets shot vaccine injectionBy Michelle Andrews
KHN

When kids start school this fall, it’s a sure bet that some won’t have had their recommended vaccines because their parents have claimed exemptions from school requirements for medical, religious or philosophical reasons.

Following the much publicized outbreak of measles that started in Disneyland in California in December, these exemptions have drawn increased scrutiny.

That outbreak, which eventually infected 147 people in seven states, was a wake-up call for many parents, who may not have realized how contagious or serious the disease can be, and for states as well, say public health officials.

“States are beginning to realize that they have effective measures to combat these outbreaks, and philosophical exemptions are eroding these protections and resulting in significant costs to states,” says Dr. Carrie Byington, professor of pediatrics at the University of Utah and chairwoman of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases. Continue reading

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Pain by the numbers

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 Illustration of the pain pathway in René Descartes' Traite de l'homme (Treatise of Man) 1664

Illustration of the pain pathway in René Descartes’ Traite de l’homme (Treatise of Man) 1664

By Rachel Gotbau
KHN

In one of the largest population studies on pain to date, researchers with the National Institutes of Health estimate that nearly 40 million Americans experience severe pain and more than 25 million have pain every day.

 

Those with severe pain were more likely to have worse health status, use more health care and suffer from more disability than those with less severe pain. Continue reading

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Why your doctor won’t friend you on Facebook

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like-thumb-facebookBy Shefali Luthra
KHN

Doctors’ practices are increasingly trying to reach their patients online. But don’t expect your doctor to “friend” you on Facebook – at least, not just yet.

Physicians generally draw a line: Public professional pages – focused on medicine, similar to those other businesses offer – are catching on. Some might email with patients.

But doctors aren’t ready to share vacation photos and other more intimate details with patients, or even to advise them on medication or treatment options via private chats.

They’re hesitant to blur the lines between personal lives and professional work and nervous about the privacy issues that could arise in discussing specific medical concerns on most Internet platforms.

Some of that may eventually change. One group, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, broke new ground this year in its latest social media guidelines. It declined to advise members against becoming Facebook friends, instead leaving it to physicians to decide.

“If the physician or health care provider trusts the relationships enough … we didn’t feel like it was appropriate to really try to outlaw that,” said Nathaniel DeNicola, an ob-gyn and clinical associate at the University of Pennsylvania, who helped write the ACOG guidelines. Continue reading

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